Virginia State EEOICPA Statistics

DOL Part B and Part E Statistics

NIOSH Dose Reconstruction Statistics

Virginia EEOICPA Facilities

Facility descriptions credit: DOE

Babcock and Wilcox Company's main plant at Mount Athos and the Lynchburg Research Center, also known as the Lynchburg Technology Center in Lynchburg, VA, performed work for a variety of Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and DOE projects.
Babcock and Wilcox Company's Nuclear Facilities Plant in Lynchburg, VA, participated in the AEC's Oxide Pellet Fabrication Program, which was managed by the New York Operations Office. Records indicate that shipments of enriched uranium were made to and from the Fernald facility during the years 1968-1972. The company also recovered highly enriched uranium from weapons scrap received from the DOE's Oak Ridge facility between 1985 and 1996. In 1997 the Babcock & Wilcox Company facility in Lynchburg, VA became the BWX Technologies facility. From 1998 to 2000, the company fulfilled a contract for the recovery of enriched uranium from scrap materials containing beryllium. The Lynchburg plant also participated in a DOE-sponsored program called Project Sapphire, under which the plant had responsibility from 1995 to 2001 for downblending enriched uranium obtained from the government of Kazakhstan.
During the period of residual contamination, as designated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and as noted in the dates above, employees of subsequent owners and operators of this facility are also covered under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

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The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility is a basic research laboratory built to probe the nucleus of the atom to learn more about the quark structure of matter.

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The University of Virginia was involved with centrifuge technology prior to the existence of the Manhattan Engineer District (MED). Once established, the MED was interested in this technology and records show that the University of Virginia received UF6 from Harshaw Chemical Company in various shipments as part of the MED’s efforts to explore the use of this technology for the production of UF6 in nuclear weapons. The MED ultimately did not choose this method of uranium production for the development of the bomb and work on centrifuges temporarily ceased at the University of Virginia by the end of 1944. The centrifuge work was re-initiated in the mid-1950 but this latter work did not involve the production of nuclear material for use in an atomic weapon.
During the period of residual contamination, as designated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and as noted in the dates above, employees of subsequent owners and operators of this facility are also covered under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

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