EEOICPA Statistics for Claimants Living in Pennsylvania

DOL Part B and Part E Statistics

NIOSH Dose Reconstruction Statistics

Pennsylvania EEOICPA Facilities

Facility descriptions credit: DOE

Beginning in 1951, Aeroprojects Inc. performed research and development for the AEC. The company's work included investigation of the use of ultrasonic energy in the areas of instrumentation, welding, filling of tubes with powders, extrusion, solidification and cleaning. Materials used by the company include alloys and compounds of aluminum, beryllium, mercury, thorium and uranium.
During the period of residual contamination, as designated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and as noted in the dates above, employees of subsequent owners and operators of this facility are also covered under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

More Information

In the late 1940s, Aliquippa Forge (previously Vulcan Crucible) was a supplier of rolled uranium rods used in Hanford's reactors. The AEC operated a rolling mill, two furnaces and cutting and extrusion equipment at Vulcan. Work at the site ended in 1950.
This site was designated as part of the Formerly Utilized Site Remediation Action Program (FUSRAP) in 1983 and remediation work took place was in 1988 and again in 1993-1994. This work was performed under the Bechtel National Inc. umbrella contract for DOE site environmental remediation.
During the period of residual contamination, as designated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and as noted in the dates above, employees of subsequent owners and operators of this facility are also covered under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

More Information

The Aluminum Company of America (Alcoa) site in New Kensington, Pennsylvania was one of 14 facilities in the early 1940s that produced nuclear fuel for the X-10 pilot plant reactor in Oak Ridge, Tennessee and the production reactors at Hanford, Washington. Alcoa used a unique welding process to "can" and seal uranium slugs produced by these other facilities. During the period of residual contamination, as designated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and as noted in the dates above, employees of subsequent owners and operators of this facility are also covered under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

 More Information

The Manhattan Engineer District and the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) contracted with the facility for the production of beryllium metal, beryllium oxide, and beryllium powder. The AEC contracted with the facility for the refining and fabrication of beryllium. Later the facility produced beryllium blanks for the Y-12 plant and Dow (Rocky Flats).

More Information

In 1947, the Beryllium Corporation plant at Reading produced highly distilled and pure beryllium oxide on a small scale for the AEC. By 1960, the plant focused on alloy and oxide work. In 1961, the plant supplied beryllium parts to the Y-12 plant and produced beryllium powder for the AEC from government inventory beryllium ingots. Although all major Berylco contracts (beyond 1961) and purchase orders reviewed to date show that the final product shipped from Hazelton, it has been clarified that but for the alloy and oxide work performed in Reading, the contracts and purchase orders fulfilled for the AEC by Hazelton could not have been completed.

More Information

In 1951, eight assorted uranium billets weighing a total of 346 pounds, originating at Birdsboro, were received by the AEC's Lake Ontario Ordnance Works.
In 1952, Birdsboro received 11.5 pounds of uranium wafers for processing.

More Information

During the Manhattan Project, Carnegie Institute of Technology was key participant in research on the phases of special metals and their alloys. It also worked on the development of methods for testing materials of construction and the construction of “necessary equipment.”

More Information

Beginning in 1943, Carpenter Steel Corporation was one of the 14 private contractors and vendors that produced fuel for the Oak Ridge X-10 pilot plant reactor and the full-scale Hanford production reactors. As an alternative to extrusion, the Carpenter Steel Company of Reading, Pennsylvania experimented with rolled uranium rods in July 1944, but these proved to be inferior to the extruded product. The metal tended to form laps and seams on the surfaces of the rolled bars. Carpenter Steel has since changed its name to Carpenter Technology Corporation. 1947, the Beryllium Corporation plant at Reading produced highly distilled and pure beryllium oxide on a small scale for the AEC. By 1960, the plant focused on alloy and oxide work. In 1961, the plant supplied beryllium parts to the Y-12 plant and produced beryllium powder for the AEC from government inventory beryllium ingots. Although all major Berylco contracts (beyond 1961) and purchase orders reviewed to date show that the final product shipped from Hazelton, it has been clarified that but for the alloy and oxide work performed in Reading, the contracts and purchase orders fulfilled for the AEC by Hazelton could not have been completed.

More Information

 

In 1943, C.H. Schnorr & Company began providing metal fabrication services in support of Manhattan Engineer District (MED) operations. C.H. Schnorr machined extruded uranium for the Hanford Pile Project. Operations may have continued until 1951 when the building was sold.
Although this site was designated for the Formerly Utilized Site Remediation Action Program (FUSRAP) in 1992, the only year in which remediation work was performed was 1994.
During the period of residual contamination, as designated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and as noted in the dates above, employees of subsequent owners and operators of this facility are also covered under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

More Information

In March 1957, a series of hot uranium forging tests were conducted at the Chambersburg Engineering company by the Metallurgical Department of National Lead Company of Ohio (Fernald). Approximately 150 hot uranium slugs were forged into washers on two Chambersburg air compressor impactors.

More Information

Foote Mineral had a pilot plant at its East Whiteland Township location which processed monazite sands. Monazite sands are known to have a very high thorium content. Because the AEC needed fairly large quantities of thorium, they were very interested in different methods of extracting it from monazite sands.
Other work performed by Foote Mineral on behalf of the Atomic Energy Commission, including their work with zirconium, is not covered under EEOICPA.
Foote Mineral Company was also a major importer of beryl ore from Brazil. Under contract to the Atomic Energy Commission, Foote Mineral Company procured 500 tons of beryl ore in 1947.
During the period of residual contamination, as designated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and as noted in the dates above, employees of subsequent owner

More Information

Frankford Arsenal has been delisted and is no longer covered under EEOICPA.
The Frankford Arsenal performed experimental research on uranium tetrachloride. It also served as a storage site for approximately 500 pounds of normal uranium metal rods. January 1, 1952-December 31, 1967.

 More Information

Under contract to the Mallinckrodt Chemical Co., the site was used to heat, press and water quench uranium "dingots". Approximately 100,000 pounds of normal uranium metal was shaped at Heppenstall over about a 6-month period. Records indicate that the forging was done on a 1000 ton press on a schedule of two days per month by a Heppenstall crew of eight men.
During the period of residual contamination, as designated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and as noted in the dates above, employees of subsequent owners and operators of this facility are also covered under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

More Information

Records indicate that in December 1952, uranium­ contaminated nickel scrap metals were sent to Jessop, which were used to produce stainless-steel piping for production equipment vital to Fernald atomic weapons production. In March 1954, Jessop sheared uranium plates that were sent to the Savannah River Site.

 More Information

In conjunction with the Kennecott Copper Co., Koppers conducted pilot plant tests for the production of uranium hexafluoride. In 1956, Koppers was licensed receive 2000 pounds of refined source material for use in studies toward the preparation of uranium dioxide for reactor fuel elements and 6,150 pounds of refined source material for use in research and pilot plant investigations on feed material processing. In October 1957, they were authorized to receive 110 pounds of normal uranium hexafluoride. Most of the research works appears to have taken place at the Koppers Research Department in Verona, PA.
During the period of residual contamination, as designated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and as noted in the dates above, employees of subsequent owners and operators of this facility are also covered under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

More Information

In 1952, National Lead of Ohio (Fernald) personnel performed tests involving the machining of uranium slugs at Landis Machine Tool Company. The tests were performed over a two day period.

More Information

The Manhattan District History indicates that the McDanel Refractory was used to fabricate oddly shaped beryllium crucibles or beryllium crucible stopper rods for the Manhattan Project, but was not used on a large-scale production basis.

More Information

The Nuclear Material and Equipment Company (NUMEC) began operations at the Apollo facility in 1957. NUMEC processed unirradiated uranium scrap for the AEC in the 1960s. This facility also provided enriched uranium to the naval reactors program and included a plutonium plant, plutonium plant storage area, highly enriched uranium fuel facility, metals and hafnium complex and a uranium hexafluoride storage area. The facility also fabricated plutonium-beryllium neutron sources. The Apollo facility ceased manufacturing nuclear fuel in 1983.
On April 17, 1967, NUMEC sold all of its assets to the Atlantic Richfield Company’s wholly-owned subsidiary, which was given the name NUMEC II. As a condition of that sale, the original NUMEC was required to both change its name to the “N.M.E. Liquidating Corporation” and to dissolve its corporate existence. In 1971, the Atlantic Richfield Company sold its subsidiary NUMEC II to the Babcock & Wilcox Company (B&W). B&W absorbed NUMEC II by the end of 1974, at which point in time NUMEC II ceased to exist. B&W is the current owner of the Apollo facility. NUMEC II and B&W are both “successor” corporations of NUMEC that acquired NUMEC’s statuses as an atomic weapons employer and a beryllium vendor.
During the period of residual contamination, as designated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and as noted in the dates above, employees of subsequent owners and operators of this facility are also covered under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

More Information

The Nuclear Material and Equipment Company (NUMEC) began operations at the Parks Township facility in 1957. The primary function of the NUMEC Parks Township facility was the fabrication of plutonium fuel, the preparation of high-enriched uranium fuel, and the production of zirconium/hafnium bars. The Parks Township facility ceased fuel fabrication activities in 1980.
On April 17, 1967, NUMEC sold all of its assets to the Atlantic Richfield Company’s wholly-owned subsidiary, which was given the name NUMEC II. As a condition of that sale, the original NUMEC was required to both change its name to the “N.M.E. Liquidating Corporation” and to dissolve its corporate existence. In 1971, the Atlantic Richfield Company sold its subsidiary NUMEC II to the Babcock & Wilcox Company (B&W). B&W absorbed NUMEC II by the end of 1974, at which point in time NUMEC II ceased to exist. B&W is the current owner of the Parks Township facility. NUMEC II and B&W are both “successor” corporations of NUMEC that acquired NUMEC’s statuses as an atomic weapons employer and a beryllium vendor.
During the period of residual contamination, as designated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and as noted in the dates above, employees of subsequent owners and operators of this facility are also covered under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

 More Information

Pennsylvania Salt experimented with samples of fluoride containing byproducts from AEC operations to determine if they could be used for hydrogen fluoride production or to extract uranium from the material. Penn Salt was licensed to receive scrap from AEC operations.

More Information

The Philadelphia Naval Yard has been delisted and is no longer a covered EEOICPA facility. In 1944, the Navy built a thermal diffusion pilot plant using concentric hot and cold pipes at the Philadelphia Naval Yard. The S-50 plant at Oak Ridge was a large-scale version of this plant. A large quantity of uranium hexafluoride was processed at this site.

More Information

Shippingport Atomic Power Station, located in Shippingport, Pennsylvania, was one of the first large-scale nuclear power plants in the world.
**Consistent with the Act, coverage is limited to activities not performed under the responsibility of the Naval Nuclear Propulsion program.

More Information

Superior Steel produced uranium strip and rolled uranium slabs for use by the Savannah River Laboratory. In 1955, for example, they hot rolled twenty-five tons of uranium into strip.
During the period of residual contamination, as designated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and as noted in the dates above, employees of subsequent owners and operators of this facility are also covered under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

More Information

Tests at the Christy Park Works, National Tube Division of the U. S. Steel Corporation, conducted in 1959 and 1960, demonstrated that rotary piercing of uranium was possible. The tests were conducted for National Lead of Ohio (Fernald).

More Information

Starting in 1948, Vitro was under contract to recover uranium from scrap. In the period from 1954-1956, Vitro had a contract to process production quantities of radioactive material (UF4) for National Lead of Ohio (Fernald). Vitro continued to provide uranium to the Atomic Energy Commission under various contracts through 1959. Additionally, a 1948 document indicates that General Electric shipped scrap containing beryllium to the Canonsburg site.
Canonsburg was a major uranium milling facility and although the EEOICPA definition of an Atomic Weapons Employer excludes mining and milling, this site is covered because of its scrap processing activities performed under contract to the Atomic Energy Commission.
The Canonsburg site is one of 24 former uranium mill sites designated for Department of Energy remediation by the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA). DOE remediation contractors performed environmental remediation under UMTRCA at the Canonsburg site from 1983-1985 and in 1996. This work involved consolidating and encapsulating all contaminated materials from the Canonsburg site into on on-site engineered disposal cell.
During the period of residual contamination, as designated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and as noted in the dates above, employees of subsequent owners and operators of this facility are also covered under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

 More Information

Westinghouse performed fabricating operations that included rolling and machining thorium metal billets into slugs for the DOE Hanford facility.

More Information

The Westinghouse Nuclear Fuels Division received shipments of nuclear materials from the AEC nuclear weapons complex in 1971 and 1972. The Cheswick site received a shipment of enriched uranium from the AEC’s Fernald plant in 1971. It also received a shipment of plutonium in 1972 from the West Valley facility. This plutonium originated out of Hanford. Because this material came from the nuclear weapons complex, the site qualifies as an Atomic Weapons Employer for these years.
Although the Westinghouse facility in Cheswick, PA, conducted substantial work with radioactive materials in other years, this work is not covered under EEOICPA because it was not related to nuclear weapons production. This includes the fabrication of nuclear fuels and reactor subsystems for naval, space, and civilian applications. Among the projects to which the Cheswick facility contributed were the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program, the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application (NERVA) program, and the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) program.
During the period of residual contamination, as designated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and as noted in the dates above, employees of subsequent owners and operators of this facility are also covered under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

More Information