EEOICPA Statistics for Claimants Living in New Jersey

DOL Part B and Part E Statistics

NIOSH Dose Reconstruction Statistics

New Jersey EEOICPA Facilities

Facility descriptions credit: DOE

Under subcontract to the Metallurgical Laboratory (University of Chicago), the Garwood facility manufactured casting dies and used them to cast uranium slugs. This work was conducted intermittently between July and November of 1944.

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The facility conducted a one-day shear (cutting) test on uranium metal for National Lead of Ohio (Fernald) in 1978.

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Baker and Company processed radioactive platinum as part of the process of making polonium, which was needed for initiators in nuclear weapons. Baker and Co. also processed unirradiated uranium scrap for the AEC to recover enriched uranium for use in the weapons complex.
During the period of residual contamination, as designated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and as noted in the dates above, employees of subsequent owners and operators of this facility are also covered under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

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This facility handled a quantity of uranium during World War II, probably in support of its work to develop effective barrier materials for the K-25 facility in Oak Ridge. The barrier materials were not radioactive.
During the period of residual contamination, as designated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and as noted in the dates above, employees of subsequent owners and operators of this facility are also covered under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

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The facility had a small research contract with the Atomic Energy Commission in 1947. In 1951, it did some experimental machining of uranium slugs for the AEC. The results were not satisfactory and the work was not expanded.

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Bowen Engineering conducted some experimental work at their laboratory in New Jersey on uranium compounds during a two-day period in 1951. The tests were to develop a process for calcining pitchblende raffinates (transforming liquid or sludge-like wastes into a more solid form).

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According to a 1944 document, the Callite Tungsten Co. used its machines to cold roll uranium metal rods for the Manhattan Engineer District.
During the period of residual contamination, as designated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and as noted in the dates above, employees of subsequent owners and operators of this facility are also covered under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act

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The Chemical Construction Company conducted research and development activities to recover uranium and other metals from low-grade waste materials. The wastes were generated by uranium processing operations at the Mallinckrodt facility in St. Louis, Missouri.
During the period of residual contamination, as designated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and as noted in the dates above, employees of subsequent owners and operators of this facility are also covered under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

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In the 1940s, E.I. DuPont de Nemours & Company (DuPont) produced uranium products and conducted research on uranium hexafluoride. These activities were conducted first for the U.S. Office of Scientific Research and Development (OSRD), and later under contract to the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). DuPont also developed processes to convert uranium dioxide to uranium hexafluoride, and produced uranium oxide and uranium metal which was used to fuel the CP-1 reactor at the University of Chicago. After completion of these activities, the AEC conducted limited decontamination and released the site to DuPont for reuse. DuPont currently operates a chemical plant at this site.
Although DuPont Deepwater Works was designated as part of the Department of Energy's Formerly Utilized Site Remediation Action Program (FUSRAP) in 1980, the only year in which actual remediation was performed under contract to the DOE was 1996. There was decontamination performed in 1997, but this did not involve the Department of Energy.
During the period of residual contamination, as designated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and as noted in the dates above, employees of subsequent owners and operators of this facility are also covered under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

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International Nickel plated uranium slugs with nickel for use in the nuclear weapons production system during the early 1950s.

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J.T. Baker Chemical was licensed by Atomic Energy Commission to process and distribute refined source material (uranium). The company had previously sought to purchase uranium compounds during World War II, but these were diverted for wartime use.

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In 1943, the M.W. Kellogg Company established the Kellex Corporation to design and construct the first gaseous diffusion uranium enrichment facility, the K-25 Plant, in Oak Ridge TN. This work was conducted under contract to the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and later to the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). In the 1940s and early 1950s, Kellex conducted research and development on fuel reprocessing and component testing using uranium hexafluoride, and uranium processing and recovery techniques. In 1951, the Vitro Corporation of America assumed all the rights and obligations of the Kellex Corporation. In 1953, Kellex discontinued all AEC contract work at the Kellex/Pierpont site.
Remediation activities under the Formerly Utilized Site Remediation Action Program (FUSRAP) occurred in 1979 and 1980 by Tobar Construction and Envirosphere Co.. The cleanup was certified in 1983.
During the period of residual contamination, as designated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and as noted in the dates above, employees of subsequent owners and operators of this facility are also covered under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

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 From 1916 to 1959, Maywood Chemical Works extracted radioactive thorium and rare earth elements from monazite sands for use in commercial products. From 1947 to 1950 the AEC purchased thorium compounds from the Maywood Chemical Company.
Although this site was designated as part of the Formerly Utilized Site Remediation Action Program (FUSRAP) in 1983, no work was ever performed under this program prior to its transfer to the Army Corp.
During the period of residual contamination, as designated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and as noted in the dates above, employees of subsequent owners and operators of this facility are also covered under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

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National Inc. umbrella site remediation contract and by local subcontractors.
During the period of residual contamination, as designated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and as noted in the dates above, employees of subsequent owners and operators of this facility are also covered under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

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In the 1940's and 1950's the Middlesex Municipal Landfill was a repository for wastes from the Middlesex Sampling Plant.
In 1980 this site was designated as part of the Formerly Utilized Site Remediation Action Program (FUSRAP), Environmental remediation work took place in 1984 and 1986. This work was performed under the Bechtel In 1943, the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) established the Middlesex Sampling Plant to assay, sample, store, and ship uranium, thorium, and beryllium ores.
Until 1950, the plant was operated by the MED and then the AEC. By 1948, Ledoux and Company and Lucius Pitkin, Inc. personnel were stationed on site to perform assaying work. Another contractor, Perry Warehouse, provided laborers until about 1950.
From 1950 to 1955, United Lead, a subsidiary of National Lead Co., operated the plant for the AEC. The plant discontinued uranium and beryllium assaying and sampling activities in 1955 and was used as a thorium storage and sampling site until 1967. In 1967, operations at Middlesex were terminated and all remaining thorium sampling activities were transferred to the Feed Materials Production Center and to the Weldon Spring Plant.
Approximately one dozen contracting companies and subcontractors were involved in the cleanup effort between 1980-1982. Between April and August 1986, material from the Middlesex Municipal Landfill was entombed at the Middlesex Sampling Plant. No further remediation was performed on-site prior to the responsibility for cleanup being shifted to the Corps of Engineers in 1997.
Throughout the course of its operations, the potential for beryllium exposure existed at this site, due to beryllium use, residual contamination, and decontamination activities.

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National Beryllia performed a demonstration of its capabilities for production of parts for Y-12 beginning in late 1968, with delivery in March 1969. Additionally, National Beryllia delivered some parts to Union Carbide (Y-12), though the records indicate there was only partial performance for this purchase order, which was terminated in April of 1973.
Between 1984 and 1986 the National Beryllia division of General Ceramics had a series of purchase orders through Martin Marietta, which was operating Y-12 at the time. These contracts involved the shipment of beryllium from Brush Wellman to National Beryllia with Y-12 being the ultimate customer.

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 From 1948 to 1978, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), a predecessor agency of the Department of Energy (DOE), used the New Brunswick Laboratory as a general nuclear standards laboratory for assaying nuclear and non-nuclear materials used in reactor and weapons programs. The New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) provided a variety of activities using nuclear materials, including thorium and uranium ores, high­ purity plutonium and americium, and enriched uranium.
In 1977 the New Brunswick Laboratory was moved from New Jersey onto the campus of Argonne National Laboratory -- East, where it remains today.
Throughout the course of its operations, the potential for beryllium exposure existed at this site, due to beryllium use, residual contamination, and decontamination activities.

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Picatinny Arsenal has been delisted and is no longer covered by EEOICPA. The Picatinny Arsenal in Dover, Picatinny performed studies on methods of radiographing uranium castings in the late 1940s using uranium billets supplied by the Atomic Energy Commission. Picatinny's work from 1948 to the mid-1950s on non-nuclear components of nuclear weapons, such as fuses, detonators, firing sets, and generators, is not covered under EEOICPA.

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 In 1951, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), a predecessor agency of the Department of Energy (DOE), began operating the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) on Site C and Site D of the James Forrestal Campus. This property is owned by Princeton University. Research at PPPL began with construction of the Model-C Stellerator, which was later converted to a pulse-operated device. Today, this laboratory continues to conduct research on nuclear fusion and development of nonweapons applications of this technology.

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Rare Earths extracted thorium from monazite sands from 1950-1960 under various contracts with the AEC. The AEC needed the thorium for its weapons program. Although the processing of monazite sands continued at Rare Earths through 1971, it was no longer performed under contract for the AEC, but rather was for commercial purposes.
Remediation activities were conducted from 1985-1987 by Thermo Analytical/Eberline and Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) under the BNI umbrella contract as part of the Formerly Utilized Site Remediation Action Program (FUSRAP).
During the period of residual contamination, as designated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and as noted in the dates above, employees of subsequent owners and operators of this facility are also covered under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

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Standard Oil locations at both 1900 East Linden Avenue (Linden) and the property at 1400 Park Avenue (Bayway) performed a variety of tasks for the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) during World War II. The company was contracted to obtain materials for work being done by the Metallurgical Laboratories of the MED. It also conducted studies and performed development work to produce uranium metal through chemical reduction processes and to construct and operate a centrifuge pilot plant for uranium separation.
The company continued to provide consulting and analytical services for the Atomic Energy Commission, but it is not believed that any radioactive materials were handled at either location after World War II (1945).
During the period of residual contamination, as designated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and as noted in the dates above, employees of subsequent owners and operators of this facility are also covered under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

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The Stevens Institute of Technology performed beryllium research and development for the AEC. Researchers at the school's Powder Metallurgy Laboratory experimented with slip casting production techniques as a replacement for the conventional vacuum-hot-pressed block process. Beryllium powder was the primary ingredient in the production process. The laboratory's working inventory during the course of the contract included approximately 50 pounds of beryllium metal powder produced by the Brush Beryllium Company.

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Tube Reducing Co. conducted tests for National Lead of Ohio (Fernald) on shaping and sizing uranium rods. In January 1952, two uranium rods were processed. More tubes were extruded in a reduction experiment in January 1955. Another test was conducted in 1957.
The firm is also mentioned in World War II-era reports as a possible location for uranium machining, but there are no indications that any such work was done at the facility during that time period.

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A small amount of beryllium mesh (15 pounds) was sent to U.S. Pipe and Foundry by the MED. Some work was done, but it is unclear whether a satisfactory technique was ever developed beyond this initial attempt to manufacture beryllium tubes.
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In December 1951, Vitro was asked to submit a proposal for research on thorium fluoride production, scrap recovery and waste recovery to involve 14 chemists and analysts. Though it is not certain whether this work was undertaken, by the late 1950s and early 1960s, Vitro conducted work under AEC contract converting low-enrichment uranium dioxide to uranium carbide spheres. The uranium dioxide was shipped from Rockwell International (then known as the Atomics International Division of North American Aviation, Inc.) to Vitro for conversion into uranium carbide and was then shipped back to Rockwell. Around 1958, Vitro also conducted work under contract to the AEC Oak Ridge Operations Office for the separation of fission products.
During the period of residual contamination, as designated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and as noted in the dates above, employees of subsequent owners and operators of this facility are also covered under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

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Westinghouse Electric, located in Bloomfield, NJ, was one of the large commercial contributors to Manhattan Project research. Specific tasks related to uranium metal production and enrichment. Because developing the technology to produce pure uranium metal became a priority for the Manhattan Project, universities, and private companies with experience in related chemical processes participated in the task. From 1942-1943, Westinghouse used a photochemical process for metallic uranium and supplied metallic uranium for the first self-sustaining chain reaction in Chicago. In addition to contributing to uranium metal production, Westinghouse Electric participated in activities related to uranium enrichment.
Westinghouse also worked with thorium under contract W-7409-ENG-31 for the Manhattan Project at this location. In the periods February through May of 1958 and again in June of 1959 Westinghouse performed rollings of uranium tubes on the Assel Mill to evaluate whether this process could be used to create a product suitable for machining into a hollow fuel core for use in a nuclear reactor.
During the period of residual contamination, as designated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and as noted in the dates above, employees of subsequent owners and operators of this facility are also covered under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

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Wyckoff Steel conducted tests of methods to straighten and finish uranium rods on September 6, 1950. 

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