EEOICPA Statistics for Claimants Living in Michigan

DOL Part B and Part E Statistics

NIOSH Dose Reconstruction Statistics

Michigan EEOICPA Facilities

Facility descriptions credit: DOE

 AC Spark Plug performed beryllium work for the AEC. Records indicate that approximately 10 men worked with beryllium at this location in 1947. Information about AC Spark Plug is found in health hazard surveys, shipping reports and in a MED history. The company continued to receive hundreds of pounds of beryllium for use under government contract into the 1960's. It is possible that some or all of this beryllium was being used for other, non-AEC projects.
There was also a small amount of thorium procurement related to AC Spark Plug in the 1946-1947 timeframe.
During the period of residual contamination, as designated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and as noted in the dates above, employees of subsequent owners and operators of this facility are also covered under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

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On May 14-18 1956, Baker-Perkins performed a test of their mixing equipment for National Lead Company of Ohio (Fernald). The tests involved mixing uranium trioxide (orange oxide) with water and kneading the mixture with the Baker-Perkins “P” and “K” Ko-Kneader machines.

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Starting on May 25, 1954, the Bridgeport Brass Company had a contract with the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) to operate the extrusion plant designated here as the Adrian Facility, which was located at 1450 E. Beecher Street in Adrian, Michigan. Bridgeport Brass operated a special metals extrusion press and produced uranium fuel elements for the Hanford and Savannah River Plant reactors and developmental extrusion work on thorium and depleted natural and slightly enriched uranium at the Adrian Facility.
After termination of AEC activities in 1961, most of this plant's functions were transferred to Reactive Metals, Inc. (RMI) in Ashtabula, Ohio. Bridgeport shipped one large extrusion press to RMI and all other equipment was dismantled and scrapped. Decontamination and closeout work was accomplished in 1962, after the presses had been removed to Ohio.
Although this site was designated as part of the Formerly Utilized Site Remediation Action Program (FUSRAP) in 1985, the only year in which remediation work took place, by or on behalf of the DOE, was 1995. The 1995 work was performed under the Bechtel National Inc. umbrella contract for DOE site environmental remediation.

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The Brush Beryllium Company in Detroit, MI, was one of several companies that rolled or extruded uranium rods for Hanford reactor fuel in the late 1940s and early 1950s. In 1950, Hanford began making rolled uranium rods onsite, but the Atomic Energy Commission shifted the rolling work to the Fernald, OH, Feed Materials Production Center and its supporting contractors in 1952. A number of private companies, including Brush Beryllium Company, contracted with Fernald to provide Hanford with these rolled rods.
Due to Brush Wellman’s status as a statutory beryllium vendor, all employees of Brush Wellman in the U. S., regardless of location, are covered for the entire period for which Brush Wellman and its predecessors supplied beryllium to the U. S. Department of Energy or its predecessor agencies. That period is defined as August 13, 1943 and continuing.
Additionally, on March 8, 2011 the corporate name of Brush Wellman, Inc. changed to Materion Brush, Inc.

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In 1956, the Carboloy Company conducted operations to turn down the outer diameter of uranium slugs.

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A November 7, 1944, document indicates that Extruded Metals participated in work related to metal fabrication for the Manhattan Project. 

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Gerity-Michigan operated a 2200/550 ton tube and rod extrusion press and performed the first extrusion of beryllium there on May 11, 1949 for the AEC. Documentation, specifically accountability reports, indicates that work continued there through the 1950s.
Gerity-Michigan was also under contract to the AEC to put extrusion presses into operating condition at the Adrian, Michigan facility.

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In a test for National Lead of Ohio (Fernald), Mitts and Merrell reduced a thorium metal chunk to small particle size pieces in its Hog Grinder.
During the period of residual contamination, as designated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and as noted in the dates above, employees of subsequent owners and operators of this facility are also covered under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

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The Oliver Corporation participated in green salt briquetting testing for the National Lead Company of Ohio (Fernald). Records indicate that testing took place in November 1956, July 1957, May 1961 and May 1962. It is unclear from the documentation whether the company ever performed this work at a production level. The Oliver Corporation AEC license history indicates that it was licensed to receive 350 pounds of normal uranium (40-6977 - 03/08/63) and 20,000 pounds of uranium enriched U-235 (70-646 – 03/26/62) (but comments that records indicate that it is not related to its work for NLO).

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Revere Copper and Brass extruded uranium rods at its Detroit plant starting in 1943 under contracts XPG-773-1/2 and RPG-704-1/2 for the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). Additionally, in October 1964, Revere Copper and Brass produced one thorium bar, which was divided up and sent to a number of AEC facilities.
Revere also extruded beryllium ingots and billets into rods at its Detroit plant between 1946 and 1950. Revere had a contract with the AEC for beryllium work, but not with the MED. Revere also worked with beryllium alloys. Some of the beryllium work was done on parts or components for the Materials Testing reactor.
During the period of residual contamination, as designated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and as noted in the dates above, employees of subsequent owners and operators of this facility are also covered under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

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Speedring machined beryllium-containing parts for Rocky Flats and Y-12. The Detroit Speedring office designation covers both of the locations to which the Detroit forwarding office sent work, including their locations in Warren, MI and Rochester Hills, MI. There is a separate Speedring facility in Cullman, Alabama.

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The Star Cutter Corporation manufactured machine tools. Records indicate that National Lead of Ohio (Fernald) conducted a one-time test of a Star Cutter drill to hollow uranium slugs.

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The University of Michigan developed radar fuses and conducted ordnance research to assist Los Alamos in atomic bomb research and production.
Records indicate that small quantities of uranium metal were handled at the University of Michigan under AEC contract. The contract expired April 10th, 1944. It is unknown whether or not similar work was performed before or after this date.

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 In 1943, the University of Chicago subcontracted to Wolverine Tube of Detroit, Michigan, for help in extrusion of metals that were needed as part of the Manhattan Project. Wolverine Tube performed research on the fabrication of aluminum slugs and the process of aluminum canning and also experimented with thorium and beryllium. This contract ended in 1946. Wolverine Tube received other AEC contracts because of its extrusion expertise.
During the period of residual contamination, as designated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and as noted in the dates above, employees of subsequent owners and operators of this facility are also covered under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

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