EEOICPA Statistics for Claimants Living in Illinois

DOL Part B and Part E Statistics

NIOSH Dose Reconstruction Statistics

Illinois EEOICPA Facilities

Facility descriptions credit: DOE

After World War II, many companies working for the United States Government produced UF6 feed for uranium enrichment and diffusion plants. The Allied Plant in Metropolis, IL was completed and initial deliveries began sometime in 1959. In 1962, several feed plants were shut down and the privately-owned Allied Chemical Company Plant in Metropolis, IL, took over the conversion of U3O8 to UF6. This plant produced approximately five thousand tons of uranium hexafluoride feed for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant per year. It was shut down in 1964. Though it later reopened, it is not clear that any material after this date was used in the Atomic Weapons Production Process.
During the period of residual contamination, as designated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and as noted in the dates above, employees of subsequent owners and operators of this facility are also covered under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

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In 1960, American Machine and Metals demonstrated a process for National Lead of Ohio (Fernald) that involved dehydration of green salt using a centrifuge process.

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Argonne is one of the U.S. Department of Energy's largest research centers. It is also the nation's first national laboratory, chartered in 1946. The Laboratory specializes in reactor engineering, reactor physics, chemistry and metallurgy. Early reactor research focused on the production of plutonium from uranium.
Argonne is a direct descendant of the University of Chicago's Metallurgical Laboratory, part of the World War II Manhattan Project to build the atomic bomb before the Nazis did. It was at the Met Lab where, on December 2, 1942, Enrico Fermi and his band of about 50 colleagues created the world's first controlled nuclear chain reaction in a squash court at the University of Chicago.
The premises covered under this listing include all those which are part of the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) campus in Argonne, Illinois and those in which operations associated with the former Met Lab were performed under contract to the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) once Met Lab operations were administratively incorporated into ANL.
Throughout the course of its operations, the potential for beryllium exposure existed at this site, due to beryllium use, residual contamination, and decontamination activities.

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Records indicate that Armour Research Foundation may have tested radioactive materials for National Lead Company of Ohio (Fernald), specifically test quantities of materials other than metal (UF4 or ThO2).

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 Blockson Chemical Company operated a plant which produced uranium from phosphoric acid. The AEC contracted with Blockson for the recovery of the uranium, which was ultimately used in weapons production. The AEC Uranium production work performed by Blockson was conducted in a one-story brick structure known as Building 55.
This listing is also intended to cover the AEC-funded laboratory, pilot plant and oxidation process, which also occurred at Blockson, and was related to the work in Building 55.
During the period of residual contamination, as designated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and as noted in the dates above, employees of subsequent owners and operators of this facility are also covered under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

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C-B Tool Products

For a six month period in 1944, C-B Tool Products Company had a subcontract with the University of Chicago to provide personnel, facilities, and equipment to produce special machining of parts for special equipment, tools, jigs, and fixtures to the Met Lab from materials provided by the University of Chicago. It is unclear whether the company handled radioactive materials.

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Crane Co. supplied the Atomic Energy Commission with uranium and thorium in the 1940s (and perhaps in the 1950s) and likely used materials containing uranium in manufacturing valves for the AEC. At the completion of one project in 1949, 1000 pounds of contaminated wastes, including 346 grams of uranium, were shipped from Crane to Oak Ridge. In 1949, Crane also shipped 265 kg of normal uranium to Hanford. In 1954, records indicate government interest in purchasing more uranium and thorium from Crane, but this work has not been verified.

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The Dow facility in Madison, Illinois, supplied the AEC with Magnesium-thorium sheets and plates, non radioactive equipment, metal products and other services. Dow received a purchase order from Mallinckrodt in March 1960, for research and development on the extrusion of uranium metal and rod. The Department of Energy also has invoices from 1957 and 1958 indicating that the Mallinckrodt Chemical Company Uranium division purchased magnesium-thorium plates and sheets from the Dow Chemical Company in Madison Illinois.
Dow sold this facility in 1969 to Consolidated Aluminum, which continued to operate the facility from 1969 through 1986. However, during the period of 1969-1986, the operations were of a purely commercial nature and did not involve AEC or Department of Energy contracts. Spectrulite subsequently purchased the plant from Consolidated Aluminum.
Although this site was designated as part of the Formerly Utilized Site Remediation Action Program (FUSRAP) in 1992, no remediation work ever took place under the DOE FUSRAP program prior to that program being transferred to the Army Corps of Engineers in 1997.
During the period of residual contamination, as designated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and as noted in the dates above, employees of subsequent owners and operators of this facility are also covered under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

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From February 1944 through June 1944, ERA Tool and Engineering Company contracted with the University of Chicago to supply services and supplies to the Met Lab, specifically to provide necessary personnel, facilities, and equipment required to produce special machining of parts for special equipment, tools, jigs, fixtures, etc. from materials furnished by the University. It is unclear from the records whether ERA handled radioactive materials as part of its work.

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Fansteel Metallurgical Corp. performed beryllium work for the Manhattan Engineer District under Contract No. W-7425 eng-27 for the fabrication of beryllium into sintered shapes and for the manufacture of 600 bricks for delivery to Los Alamos. Fansteel also worked with "approximately 150 pounds of nominal grade beryllium carbide powder" for use in the Nuclear Energy for the Propulsion of Aircraft (NEPA) project. This work is reported to have occurred between April and June of 1950.

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 The Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab for short) got its started as the National Accelerator Laboratory, which marks the year that the first employees were hired. Its name was formally changed to the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in 1972. Fermilab has one of the most powerful particle accelerators in the world and is used to conduct a variety of high-energy physics programs.
Throughout the course of its operations, the potential for beryllium exposure existed at this site, due to beryllium use, residual contamination, and decontamination activities.

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From October 1952 through 1966, General Steel Castings/Industries performed quality control work for the AEC. Specifically, it x-rayed uranium ingots and betatron slices to detect metallurgical flaws for Mallinckrodt Chemical Company. This work was performed in a facility located at 1417 State Street, which was part of what was later known as the "South Plant" of Granite City Steel. This listing is intended to cover only the South Plant, identified by the State Street address, and not any other facility that may have been owned by Granite City Steel prior to or after its purchase of the General Steel Industries facility in the early 1970s. For example, this listing does not cover Granite City Steel facilities on Madison or 20th Street.
During the period of residual contamination, as designated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and as noted in the dates above, employees of subsequent owners and operators of this facility are also covered under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

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In 1952, the Great Lakes Carbon Corp. studied graphite for the Atomic Energy Commission and in 1958 it did some Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) fuel work for Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). As part of the contract, ANL agreed to decontaminate the facility used. It handled radioactive uranium and radioactive thorium under AEC contract.

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The 39th Street Warehouse was occupied by the Metallurgical Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory until approximately 1949. Activities in the building included the storage of radioactive materials.

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 International Register was involved in the development of uranium machining techniques for the Metallurgical Lab and the Manhattan Project. Records indicate that a test of centerless grinding equipment took place at International Register in February 1943. Uranium rods (1" in diameter and 6" long) were ground with the accuracy of about .001" for the Met Lab.

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Records indicate that Armour Research Foundation may have tested radioactive materials for National Lead Company of Ohio (Fernald), specifically test quantities of materials other than metal (UF4 or ThO2).

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Lindsay Light and Chemical was a commercial processor of monazite sands, which yield several commercially valuable products, including the radioactive metal thorium. The Manhattan Engineer District and then the Atomic Energy Commission purchased thorium from Lindsay; AEC contractors purchased a variety of products from this firm as well. Documents indicate that the firm supplied thorium to the MED and AEC through at least 1953. The facility received a source material license from the AEC in 1956, and it continued to process radioactive materials for commercial purposes until 1973.
During the period of residual contamination, as designated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and as noted in the dates above, employees of subsequent owners and operators of this facility are also covered under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

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The University of Chicago's Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) was involved in early uranium metallurgical work as part of the Manhattan Project. The first self-sustaining nuclear chain reaction was achieved at the university in a "pile" called the Chicago Pile 1, built by Enrico Fermi and his Met Lab colleagues. The Met Lab is the direct predecessor of Argonne National Laboratory into which all Met Lab functions were transferred in 1946.
Beryllium use at the Metallurgical Laboratory is linked with experimental studies in determining whether to use graphite, heavy water or beryllium as a pile moderator. Graphite was the ultimate choice for Fermi's pile.
*In 1982-1984 and 1987 environmental remediation was conducted in Eckhart Hall, Jones Laboratory and Ryeson Hall. Only environmental remediation work performed under contract to the DOE performed in these buildings as DOE facility employment during the time period.

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 A November 7, 1944, document indicates that Midwest Manufacturing worked on the "self-lubricating draw die" which was related to metal fabrication for the Manhattan Project.

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Portions of the East Pavilion of the Museum of Science and Industry were used by employees of the Metallurgical Laboratory and the Argonne National Laboratory. Although the facility was primarily used as office space, it is believed that radioactive materials were handled at this facility and that a spill of radioactive material may have taken place near the service elevator on the ground floor.

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In the 1940s, the Manhattan Project leased the National Guard Armory from the State of Illinois for uranium processing and radioactive material storage. In 1951, the site was returned to the State of Illinois.
Although this site was designated as part of the Formerly Utilized Site Remediation Action Program (FUSRAP) in 1985, the only year in which remediation work took place was 1987.
During the period of residual contamination, as designated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and as noted in the dates above, employees of subsequent owners and operators of this facility are also covered under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

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In 1957, National Lead Company of Ohio (Fernald) used equipment at the Podbeilniac Corp. to conduct an extraction experiment using uranium in solution. NLO later traveled to the site to oversee the decontamination of equipment used in the experiment.

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Precision Extrusion was involved in several projects for the Atomic Energy Commission and Argonne National Laboratory. From 1949 to 1950, it extruded experimental fuel channel tubes from aluminum and aluminum-lithium alloys. During 1956 through 1959, Precision Extrusion performed several uranium extrusion projects on a small-scale basis.

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In 1944, Quality Hardware had a contract to support the University of Chicago. The company canned experimental unbonded uranium slugs for Hanford and may have canned all of the slugs used in the Hanford production reactors during World War II.

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R. Krasburg and Sons Manufacturing

In 1944, R. Krasburg entered into a subcontract with the University of Chicago for services and supplies for the Metallurgical Laboratory. The subcontract required Krasburg to provide necessary personnel, facilities and equipment to produce special machining of parts for special equipment, tools, jigs, fixtures, etc., from materials furnished by the University. It is unclear from the documentation whether Krasburg handled any radioactive materials as part of its work.

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In 1953, Argonne National Laboratory suggested that Sciaky Brothers be used to perform a stitch welding operation for a uranium cord, zirconium clad specimen EBR irradiation. The documentation does not indicate whether this work actually took place. The company may also have done electron beam melting or welding of uranium metal on an experimental basis.

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Swenson Evaporator was scheduled to perform a raffinate spray drying test for National Lead Company of Ohio (NLO) on March 20, 1951. This test would have involved some radioactive residue. The drums containing the raffinate were shipped to Swenson by Mallinckrodt, but it is believed that they were not opened and the test not performed.

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The W.E. Pratt Manufacturing Company performed metal fabrication tasks (machining and grinding) for the University of Chicago Metallurgical Laboratory beginning in the spring of 1943. The purpose of the machining done by Pratt was to speed up delivery of pieces for the experimental pile and to learn all that could be learned about handing uranium metal in turret lathes and automatic screw machines. In 1944, Pratt was subcontracted by the University of Chicago to finish “short metal rods” by centerless grinding. This work continued until June 30, 1946. The Manhattan Engineer District History indicates that DuPont placed an order with Pratt to turn and grind unbonded Hanford slugs.
During the period of residual contamination, as designated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and as noted in the dates above, employees of subsequent owners and operators of this facility are also covered under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

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In 1943, the Metallurgical Laboratory conducted experiments of centerless grinding equipment on uranium. Wyckoff Drawn Steel surfaced two tubes and one rod, but their process was deemed to be too expensive and too slow to be used in production.

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