EEOICPA Statistics for Claimants Living in Florida

DOL Part B and Part E Statistics

NIOSH Dose Reconstruction Statistics

Florida EEOICPA Facilities

Facility descriptions credit: DOE

American Beryllium Company machined parts for Y-12 and Rocky Flats. Generally, the beryllium for these parts was supplied by Kawecki Berylco Industries, Inc.

More Information

Under contract with the AEC, Armour operated a pilot plant which produced uranium from phosphoric acid.

More Information

Under contract to the AEC, Gardinier (under the name U.S. Phosphoric Products) operated a pilot plant from 1951 to 1954 which recovered uranium from phosphoric acid. From 1956 to 1961, it produced uranium by recovery of U3O8 from phosphoric acid. Maximum production was 60 tons of uranium concentrate per year. The uranium was ultimately used in weapons production.
During the period of residual contamination, as designated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and as noted in the dates above, employees of subsequent owners and operators of this facility are also covered under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

More Information

International Minerals and Chemical Corp. produced uranium as a byproduct of the recovery of phosphate chemicals and fertilizers. The 1951, AEC contracted with International Minerals and Chemical Corp. for the recovery of uranium, which was ultimately used for the production of weapons. The original production plant was shut down in 1959. Starting in 1954, the uranium recovery unit was located at the Bonnie Plant. In 1955, it switched to the phosphoric acid process. International Minerals and Chemical Corp. became Central Farmers (now C.F.) Industries; in 1969, C.F. Industries became C.F. Chemicals, Bartow Phosphate Works. The phosphoric process was shut down in 1961.
During the period of residual contamination, as designated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and as noted in the dates above, employees of subsequent owners and operators of this facility are also covered under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

 More Information

In 1957, the AEC purchased the Pinellas Plant from General Electric. During operations, the plant manufactured precisely timed neutron generators used to initiate nuclear explosions. As older nuclear weapons were removed from the national stockpile, the accelerator-type neutron generators produced at Pinellas gradually replaced polonium-beryllium initiators manufactured at the Mound site. Pinellas also fabricated other electronic and mechanical nuclear weapons components, including neutron detectors, lightning-arrestor connectors, specialty capacitors and switches, crystal resonators, and optoelectronic devices.
In September 1994, Pinellas stopped producing weapons-related components, and its mission changed to environmental restoration of the facility. Production work was transferred to the Kansas City, Missouri, plant and Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, New Mexico.
During the periods that DOE performed remediation, organic compounds (primarily chlorinated ethenes) in drums and concentrated in soil were removed from onsite areas through excavation and use of large-diameter auguring. The areas were then backfilled with clean material. This work removed the sources of ground water contaminants. No radioactive material was found.
Throughout the course of its operations, the potential for beryllium exposure existed at this site due to beryllium use, residual contamination, and decontamination activities.

 More Information

Documents indicate that the University of Florida handled test quantities of radioactive material under a National Lead of Ohio (Fernald) sub-contract between 1963 and 1969. Upon completion of the project, the material was sent to the Savannah River Site.
The University also obtained licenses to handle radioactive material from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Work done under these NRC licenses was not related to nuclear weapons production and is not covered under EEOICPA.

More Information

The Virginia-Carolina Chemical Corporation produced uranium as a byproduct of the recovery of phosphate chemicals and fertilizers. The AEC contracted with the Virginia-Carolina Chemical Corp. for the recovery of the uranium, which was ultimately used in weapons production.
During the period of residual contamination, as designated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and as noted in the dates above, employees of subsequent owners and operators of this facility are also covered under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

More Information

For one month in 1954, W.R. Grace performed the pilot plant work on solvent extraction for Armour Fertilizer, which used the solvent process to extract uranium from phosphates.

More Information