EEOICPA Statistics for Claimants Living in Connecticut

DOL Part B and Part E Statistics

NIOSH Dose Reconstruction Statistics

Connecticut EEOICPA Facilities

Facility descriptions credit: DOE

 American Chain and Cable worked under contract to the Du Pont Company to support the manufacture of uranium slugs during the Manhattan Project. In 1944, the company swaged (reduced the diameter) of uranium rods at its Bridgeport facility.

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 In 1942, the American Brass Company produced the barriers used in the gaseous diffusion process. In the late 1950s, under contract to Nuclear Metals Inc., the company extruded copper-clad uranium billets into tubes at least two separate times for the Savannah River Site. While the original plans called for work on 500 billets, only around 50 were actually processed. The operations involved plating, heating, extruding, sawing, drilling, deburring, cleaning, testing, crating, and shipping. Work was conducted at the West Tube Mill. AEC Health and Safety Laboratory personnel visited the site in 1956 and 1959, and obtained air quality and surface radiation measurements during the later visit.

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Bridgeport Brass, at the Havens Laboratory in Connecticut and in Adrian, Michigan, worked to improve the process for extruding uranium. Eventually this work was taken over by Reactive Metals, which operated the AEC/DOE extrusion facility in Ashtabula, Ohio. Bridgeport cut and stored uranium, and may have been involved in the rolling of uranium. Some work of the Havens Laboratory was moved to Seymour, CT, in 1962, to a facility that is now owned by Seymour Specialty Wire.
This listing is intended to cover that portion of the Havens Laboratory known as the Housatonic Pilot Plant, which has also been called the Housatonic Avenue Plant.

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Combustion Engineering (CE) sent shipments of uranium to Fernald between 1965 and 1972 for use in the nuclear weapons production process. It is because of these shipments that this site qualifies as an Atomic Weapons Employer for these years. Combustion Engineering performed substantial work for the Atomic Energy Commission in other years as well, but this work is not covered under EEOICPA because it was either non-nuclear or was not related to weapons production. Starting in the 1940s, this initial work at the site involved non-nuclear components. In 1955, CE began to use highly enriched uranium for its work in supporting the Naval Reactors Program. In the 1960s, CE obtained a license to fabricate fuel elements for power reactors.
Although this site was designated as part of the Formerly Utilized Site Remediation Action Program (FUSRAP) in 1994, no work under this program was ever performed on site.
During the period of residual contamination, as designated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and as noted in the dates above, employees of subsequent owners and operators of this facility are also covered under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

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The Connecticut Aircraft Nuclear Engine Laboratory (CANEL) worked on an Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) program to develop a nuclear reactor with which to propel aircraft. Specifically, CANEL worked on developing high temperature materials, fuel elements, and liquid metal components and coolants. CANEL consisted of a hot laboratory facility, a nuclear physics laboratory, a fuel element laboratory, a nuclear materials research and development laboratory, and other buildings. The AEC Annual report for 1959 indicates that approximately $4 million in AEC equipment was at CANEL. Plutonium, mixed fission products, and probably uranium were handled at CANEL. A former ORNL employee who had worked at CANEL stated that beryllium metal and oxide in a powdered form were also handled at CANEL. Although President Kennedy canceled the aircraft nuclear propulsion program in 1961, AEC work apparently continued at CANEL until 1965.
In November 1965, the AEC hired Dunbar Transfer Company to dispose of radioactively contaminated equipment and materials. This remediation work was completed on July 8, 1966.

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The Dorr Corp. conducted waste handling tests on low-level radioactive material (ammonium diuranate). This work was done as a subcontractor to National Lead of Ohio (Fernald). National Lead personnel monitored the tests and took air quality samples.
During the period of residual contamination, as designated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and as noted in the dates above, employees of subsequent owners and operators of this facility are also covered under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

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 Fenn conducted swaging tests on uranium rods to determine if the process could be used to produce properly shaped rods for Hanford’s production reactors. Two tests, each lasting less than one day, were conducted in June 1950.

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Beginning in the 1940s, Machlett Laboratories worked with beryllium in its commercial business as a supplier of x-ray and electron vacuum tubes. Machlett produced a handful of brazed beryllium window assemblies in 1952 under an AEC contract.

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In 1963, the New England Lime Co. (NELCO) conducted tests on “prill,” a magnesium-uranium waste product, to determine the feasibility of recovering these materials for re-use in the nuclear weapons production system. The prill came from the AEC’s Fernald facility. Six drums of prill were sent from Fernald to NELCO for the test.
The New England Lime Company also provided magnesium and calcium to the Manhattan Engineer District and Atomic Energy Commission from 1944-1956. This work did not involve radioactive materials.

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From 1962 to 1964, the Bridgeport Brass Company performed contract work at the Seymour site for the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). This work involved developing an extrusion process for natural uranium metal. After 1964, the work was consolidated at the Reactive Metals site in Ohio. Operation of the Seymour site was later taken over by employees and the facility eventually became the Seymour Specialty Wire Company.
Although this site was designated as part of the Formerly Utilized Site Remediation Action Program (FUSRAP) in 1985, remediation only took place during 1992 and 1993. This work was performed under the Bechtel National Inc. umbrella contract or DOE site environmental remediation.
During the period of residual contamination, as designated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and as noted in the dates above, employees of subsequent owners and operators of this facility are also covered under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

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  In 1952 and 1953, Sperry developed processes for testing and examining uranium plates for the Sylvania Corp., a major AEC contractor.

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The Torrington Company performed small-scale swaging experiments on uranium rods in the early 1950s. Torrington conducted this work for two companies: the Bridgeport Brass Company and American Machine and Foundry.

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