EEOICPA Statistics for Claimants Living in California

DOL Part B and Part E Statistics

NIOSH Dose Reconstruction Statistics

 

California EEOICPA Facilities

Facility descriptions credit: DOE

 Under contract to the Atomic Energy Commission from 1948-1956, initially as the Merrill Company, A.D. Little researched the separation and recovery of uranium from various ores. Specific work included the recovery of uranium and vanadium from alkaline carbonate leach solutions from domestic ores.
During the period of residual contamination, as designated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and as noted in the dates above, employees of subsequent owners and operators of this facility are also covered under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

 More Information

 

The Atomics International Division of North American Aviation is a statutory beryllium vendor under the EEOICPA. Atomics International worked with beryllium and radioactive materials under contract with the Atomic Energy Commission at numerous locations. These locations include, but are not necessarily limited to, Area IV of the Santa Susana Field Laboratory, portions of the Downey facility, the Vanowen Building at the Canoga facility and the De Soto facility.

More Information

 

C.L. Hann Industries provided machine shop services to Sandia National Laboratory, California. This work involved beryllium materials.

 More Information

Using small amounts of plutonium and uranium, the California Research Corporation performed experiments to investigate the use of continuous chelation as a means of separating plutonium and zirconium from uranium. The California Research Corporation performed the work as a subcontractor to the Kellex Corporation which was under contract to the AEC to investigate waste recovery methods.

More Information

 

Under an operating contract with the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), North American Aviation performed research and development into the peaceful uses of nuclear energy at the Canoga Avenue Facility in Canoga Park, CA. This work was previously performed at North American Aviation's Downey Facility, but was moved to Canoga Avenue at the very end of 1955. Principal work performed included design, development and radiochemistry. Beryllium machining is also believed to have occurred in there.
The Nuclear Regulatory Commission concluded in its 1995 report on the facility that it "was found to be free of radioactive materials which indicated that the area had been successfully remediated... in the past."

More Information

 

Ceradyne sold beryllium-graphite composite materials to the Y-12 plant in Oak Ridge in 1987 and between 1990 and 1996.

 More Information

Ceradyne provided beryllium parts, and possibly powder, to the Y-12 plant.

More Information

 

City Tool is a precision machine shop that provided services to Sandia National Laboratory, California. The work involved machining beryllium-copper materials.

 More Information

 

In 1959, the Atomics International Division of North American Aviation moved to its new facility on De Soto Avenue. AEC/DOE work conducted at this location included engineering design, construction, and nuclear fuel fabrication. The facility also had a radiochemistry laboratory and a gamma irradiation facility. The fuel fabrication facility was used to produce a variety of different fuel elements for test reactors. AEC-sponsored work involving the manufacture of beryllium-containing parts also took place at this site. Fuel fabrication was terminated in 1984, however small scale laboratory research work on gamma irradiation and analysis of radioactive samples continued until 1995. A DOE-owned mass spectrometer at this location was removed from the premises and sent to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in 1995.

Remedial activities occurred at various times in the 1980's followed by license termination by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. In 1998, decontamination and decommissioning of the mass spectrometer laboratory, funded by the DOE was performed by The Boeing Company. In 1998, decontamination and decommissioning of the state-licensed gamma irradiation facility was performed by The Boeing Company.

More Information


The Dow operation involved process studies and experimental investigations on different uranium ores and thorium-bearing ores, including pilot-scale solvent extraction of uranium from phosphoric acid.  

More Information

 

Under an operating contract with the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), North American Aviation operated a 2 MeV Van De Graaff accelerator at Downey. In addition, the AEC funded a four-watt Water Boiler Neutron Source Reactor at the Downey facility. Start up for the reactor was in April of 1952. This small research reactor was moved to Area IV of the Santa Susana Field Laboratory in 1955. Personnel and operations from Downey moved to the new Canoga Avenue facility in late 1955. Effective remediation of the Downey facility was accomplished at that time. In 2000, The Boeing Company performed a survey verifying that the prior remediation met current Nuclear Regulatory Commission and State of California requirements. Ownership of the Downey facility was then transferred to the City of Downey.

 More Information

 

EDM Exotics provided machine shop services to Sandia National Laboratory, California, working with beryllium-copper materials using an electrical discharging process.

More Information

Electro Circuits used uranium metal (approximately 300 lb.) to conduct tests aimed at determining the usefulness of ultrasonics in the detection of pipe in ingots.

More Information

 

Electrofusion Corporation provided beryllium products to Sandia National Laboratory, California. Electrofusion was acquired by Brush Wellman in 1990 and is currently part of the Brush Wellman Engineered Products Division.
Due to Brush Wellman’s status as a statutory beryllium vendor, all employees of Brush Wellman in the U. S., regardless of location, are covered for the entire period for which Brush Wellman and its predecessors supplied beryllium to the U. S. Department of Energy or its predecessor agencies. That period is defined as August 18, 1943 and continuing.
Additionally, on March 8, 2011 the corporate name of Brush Wellman, Inc. changed to Materion Brush, Inc.

More Information

 

General Atomics was one of a number of private contractors that processed unirradiated scrap for the Atomic Energy Commission in the 1960s. In addition, the Hot Cell Facility was used for numerous post-irradiation examinations of Department fuels, structural materials, reactor dosimetry materials, and instrumentation. The Department-sponsored activities at the General Atomics Hot Cell Facility primarily supported the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor and the Reduced­ Enrichment Research Test Reactor programs. In December 1994, General Atomics notified the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the State of California Department of Health Services of its intent to cease operations in the Hot Cell Facility.
General Atomics was also the operating contractor for the AEC's Experimental Beryllium Oxide Reactor (EBOR). General Atomics manufactured EBOR fuel elements (UO2-BeO) on site and examined them in the site's hot cell.

 During the period of residual contamination, as designated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and as noted in the dates above, employees of subsequent owners and operators of this facility are also covered under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

More Information


In 1958, General Electric constructed four hot cells for post­irradiation examination of uranium fuel and irradiated reactor components. The U.S. Government's involvement (through the Atomic Energy Commission and later, the Department of Energy) was limited to a single hot cell, Hot Cell No. 4. Between 1965 and 1967, Hot Cell No. 4 was decontaminated, equipped with a stainless steel liner to contain plutonium, and dedicated to the study of mixed oxide fuel rods in support of the Atomic Energy Commission's fast breeder reactor development programs. In 1978, Hot Cell No. 4 was placed on standby; it was used by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for six months in 1981 and 1982.
During the period of residual contamination, as designated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and as noted in the dates above, employees of subsequent owners and operators of this facility are also covered under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

More Information

 

Hafer Tool is a machine shop that provided services to Sandia National Laboratory, California. Some of this work involved the use of beryllium materials.

More Information

 

Hexcel produced a small number of corrugated beryllium sheet panels for the AEC in the mid-1960s. The finishing process involved vapor blasting and scrubbing of the beryllium panels with steel wool and cleansing powder. At the termination of the experimental project in 1965, the company sent the sheet panels and all related equipment to the AEC's Lawrence Livermore Laboratory.

More Information

The Department of Energy purchased this facility in 1984 for the purpose of producing forgings for weapons parts. It consists of 13.75 acres and 7 buildings. The DOE Rocky Flats Plant managed the forging process and produced forgings at this location through 1995. In 1994, DOE decided to close the facility upon completion of its defense-related mission in 1996. The facility was sold on June 30, 1997.

 More Information

 

In 1959, Hunter Douglas Aluminum extruded approximately 1600 pounds of solid uranium stock for National Lead Company of Ohio (Fernald). In a subsequent subcontract, the company fabricated uranium-zirconium billets for the GE Evendale Plant.  More Information

 

Jerry Carroll Machining provided machine shop services to Sandia National Laboratory, California, including the machining of beryllium-copper materials.

More Information

 

For over 30 years, LEHR was the site of studies on the long-term health effects of low-level radiation on laboratory animals. Through the support of DOE's predecessor, the AEC, LEHR (also known in the earlier years as the Radiobiology Laboratory) began in 1951 as a research project investigating the biological effects of X-rays. A few years later, the Atomic Energy Commission contracted with LEHR for what became a 33-year study that investigated the health effects of internal exposure to low levels of strontium 90 and radium 226. In a separate but related project, research animals were exposed to cobalt 60 radiation. Research involving the use of small amounts of plutonium 241, thorium 228, and other radioisotopes was also performed.
Research at LEHR has focused on: understanding better the effects of exposure to low-level radiation on the skeleton and its blood-forming constituents; investigating the behavior of certain bone-seeking radioactive materials; studying the beagle as an experimental animal model; exploring how low-level radiation triggers and affects the formation of tumors and development of leukemia; and, developing effective ways to use results gathered from animal studies to assess risks to humans. LEHR closed in 1989 and has been in remediation mode since 1991.  More Information

 

The Laboratory of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences (LBES) was established in 1947 on the campus of the University of California, Los Angeles, to provide biomedical and environmental support to nuclear testing activities. Today's programs are in three areas: nuclear medicine, where the study of positron emission tomography (PET) is applied to medical problems; biomolecular and cellular sciences, which involves factors influencing gene expression, particularly with reference to early molecular events in cancer induction; and environmental biology, which focuses on the basic physiology of plants in arid ecosystems.

More Information

The Laboratory of Radiobiology and Environmental Health (LREH), established by the Atomic Energy Commission in 1951, is an institute for research and training in cell biology. LREH is dedicated to fundamental research and investigation of the ways in which radiation and other energy-related biomedical insults affect cellular processes and lead to detrimental genetic and somatic biomedical effects. Research studies are undertaken to investigate the mechanisms by which perturbation and repair of cellular systems can affect the whole organism, cause cancer in the present generation, and damage future generations. Research focuses specifically on ways in which the organism can cope with such insults. As a research unit in the University of California San Francisco School of Medicine, the laboratory was extensively involved with the academic programs of the university, until its closure in 1999 

More Information

The laboratory that eventually became the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory was founded in 1931 by Ernest Orlando Lawrence, winner of the 1939 Nobel Prize in physics for his invention of the cyclotron. Once the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) was founded in 1942, the Berkeley Laboratory became part of the MED. As part of the MED, scientists at Berkeley developed the electromagnetic enrichment process that was installed and operated at the Y-12 plant in Oak Ridge from 1943-1947. Scientists at Berkeley also discovered the transuranium elements, which include plutonium, neptunium and americium.
Work performed on behalf of LBL which took place in Gilman Hall on the University of California campus is also considered part of LBL.
Throughout the course of its operations, the potential for beryllium exposure existed at this site, due to beryllium use, residual contamination, and decontamination activities.

 More Information

 

The Atomic Energy Commission established the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory as a facility for nuclear weapons research. The Department of Energy (DOE) owns the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Main Site and Site 300; DOE and the University of California jointly operate the sites. The Main Site was initially used as a flight training base and an engine overhaul facility. Transition from naval operations to scientific research began in 1950, when the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) authorized construction of a materials-testing accelerator site. The AEC established the University of California Radiation Laboratory, Livermore Site (the predecessor of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) as a facility for nuclear weapons research. The Department of Energy purchased Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Site 300 from local ranchers in the 1950s for use as a remote high-explosives testing facility.
Throughout the course of its operations, the potential for beryllium exposure existed at this site, due to beryllium use, residual contamination, and decontamination activities.

More Information

 

 

 The Lebow Company produces ultra-thin metal foils for Sandia National Laboratory, California, some of which contain beryllium.

 More Information

Mathieson Chemical has been delisted and is no longer a covered EEOICPA facility.

More Information

 

Pleasanton Tool provides machine shop services to Sandia National Laboratory, California.

More Information

 

Poltech Precision did machining work for Sandia National Laboratory, California.

More Information

 

Robin Materials provided metal materials to Sandia National Laboratory, California. This material included beryllium-copper.

More Information

 

Ron Witherspoon, Inc. produced beryllium springs for Sandia National Laboratory, California.

More Information

Sandia National Laboratory-Livermore was established in 1956 to conduct research and development in the interest of national security. The principal emphasis was on development and engineering of the parts of nuclear weapons outside the warhead physics package. The site was selected for its proximity to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to facilitate a close working relationship between the two laboratories.
Throughout the course of its operations, the potential for beryllium exposure existed at this site, due to beryllium use, residual contamination, and decontamination activities.

 More Information

 

 Sandia National Laboratory-Livermore was established in 1956 to conduct research and development in the interest of national security. The principal emphasis was on development and engineering of the parts of nuclear weapons outside the warhead physics package. The site was selected for its proximity to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to facilitate a close working relationship between the two laboratories.
Throughout the course of its operations, the potential for beryllium exposure existed at this site, due to beryllium use, residual contamination, and decontamination activities.  

More Information

 

 

Santa Susana Area 4

The Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) is located in eastern Ventura County, California, and borders Los Angeles County. The SSFL is divided into four administrative and operational portions based on ownership and operations. Area IV was devoted to nuclear operations. It is Area IV that is covered under EEOICPA as a DOE facility.
Coverage includes, but is not necessarily limited to the following operations: The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), the Nuclear Development Field Laboratory (NDFL), and the Liquid Metal Engineering Center (LMEC). This also includes the Sodium Reactor Experiment Facility, the Kinetics Experiment Water Boiler Facility, the Water Boiler Neutron source (which is also known as the AE-6/L-85 Facility), the Organic Moderated Reactor, as well as facilities in Area IV associated with the Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) Program; the Sodium Graphite Reactor Critical Facility, the Shield Test Experiment/Shield Test Irradiation Reactor Facility, the Advanced Epithermal Thorium Test Facility, the Hot Lab Facility, the Fuel Storage Facility, the Radioactive Measurement Facility, the Radioactive Material Handling Facility, the Van De Graaff Accelerator Facility and the Radiation Instrument Calibration Laboratory.
Decontamination, decommissioning and demolition of radiological facilities in Area IV has been funded by the DOE beginning in the 1970's, but predominantly since 1988.
Throughout the course of operations in Area IV, the potential for beryllium exposure existed.

More Information

 The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) is owned and operated by Stanford University under contract with the Department of Energy. The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center was established in 1962 as a research facility for high energy particle physics. The Center's four major experimental facilities are the Linear Accelerator, the Positron Electron Project Storage Ring, the Stanford Positron Electron Asymmetric Ring, and the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Linear Collider.

More Information

 

Stauffer performed electron beam melting tests on uranium metal for National Lead of Ohio (Fernald). The company had performed similar tests for Hanford.

 More Information

 

Tapemation is a machine shop that provided services to Sandia National Laboratory, California. Several small jobs involved the precision machining of beryllium-copper materials.

More Information

University of California has been delisted and is no longer a covered EEOICPA facility.  University of California was an AWE site from 1942-1980 and DOE site from 1981-1983 but has been removed from the program.
Gilman Hall, located on the University of California-Berkeley campus, was the site of nuclear research involving plutonium and uranium. These activities were conducted on behalf of the Manhattan Engineer District and the Atomic Energy Commission.
From December 1981 through February 1983, under agreement between DOE and the University, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory personnel performed remedial action decontamination and shielding of the contaminated areas. Remedial action was certified complete in 1985.
During the period of residual contamination, as designated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and as noted in the dates above, employees of subsequent owners and operators of this facility are also covered under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.
University of California was deleted as an EEOICPA site between September 2011 and January 2012. As of September 15, 2011 37 sick workers had filed claims with 13 of these being paid. It may be that this site was divided into other California facilities.

More Information