EEOICPA Environmental Measurements

Documents, EPA, NIOSH, DOL, DOE

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 Environmental Measurements Laboratory, New York New York

 

Environmental Measurements Laboratory  Environmental Measurements Laboratory

Environmental Measurements Lab is a DOE facility for 1946-2003 so workers are eligible to file for Part B and Part E claims.

EML traces its roots to the Medical Division of the Manhattan Project during and after World War II. The Division focused on industrial hygiene, radiation protection and safety. In 1946, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) was created. The lab was renamed the Health and Safety Division of the AEC. In 1953 it became the Health and Safety Laboratory, or HASL. Fallout from nuclear weapons tests became a major concern and the lab's focus shifted to measurements and assessments of fallout using a network of gummed film monitoring stations and measurements of the radioactivity levels in various food products. In the 1950's and 1960's, the worldwide sampling network was expanded considerably to include soil and water samples, air filter samples at the surface and in the stratosphere, biological samples, and measurements of wet and dry fallout. In the 1970's, the lab's worldwide sampling programs were expanded to include non-nuclear pollutants. When the Atomic Energy Commission was abolished in 1975, the Health and Safety Laboratory became part of the Energy Research and Development Administration. In 1977, the Energy Research and Development Administration was absorbed by the Department of Energy, and the Health and Safety Laboratory changed its name to the Environmental Measurements Laboratory.

In the 1970's, the lab performed extensive radiation transport and dosimetry studies in and around nuclear facilities, and established the Quality Assurance Program for environmental dosimeters and radioanalytical measurements. The lab also did extensive dose reconstructions for nuclear weapons tests, and studied radon in homes. The lab took immediate measurements after the Three-Mile Island and Chernobyl accidents, providing the ability to accurately and comprehensively reconstruct the environmental contamination resulting from these incidents.

In 1997, the lab underwent a major change of focus when it moved from the DOE Office of Energy Research to the Office of Environmental Management. Today, EML's primary focus is to support environmental monitoring, decommissioning, decontamination, and remediation efforts. EML continues to put its worldwide monitoring network to good use by developing models of the atmospheric transport of pollutants. The lab has assisted in developing instruments in support of non-proliferation activities and conducts in-situ measurements in support of many decontamination and decommissioning activities undertaken by DOE after the end of the Cold War. In 2003 this laboratory was incorporated into the Department of Homeland Security.

 

 

DOE

DOE lists Environmental Measurements Laboratory as a covered EEOICPA facility.

DOL

DOL provides Part B and Part E statistics EML but no Site Exposure Matrix.

NIOSH

NIOSH lists statistics for EML dose reconstructions

 Other

Wikipedia has a page on EML.

 

 

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 Photos courtesy of DOE and Library of Congress