EEOICPA Paducah

Documents, EPA, NIOSH, DOL, DOE

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Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah Kentucky

 

Paducah PlantPaducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

Paducah is a DOE facility from 1951 to the present  so workers are eligible to file both Part B and Part E claims.

Paducah has a Special Exposure Cohort which covers all workers with specific cancers and at least 250 days of employment prior to February 1, 1992.

The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, built in 1952, is twelve miles west of Paducah, Kentucky and is located on 3,556 acres.  Workers at Paducah are covered for both Part B and Part E and an SEC exists for workers who worked at the plant prior to February 1, 1992.

The Department of Energy's (DOE) Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant opened in 1952 to enrich uranium for nuclear weapons. During the plant's Cold War history, more than one million tons of uranium was processed.

Construction of the Paducah plant began in 1951 in response to the increased demand for enriched uranium for nuclear weapons production. Initial operations began in 1952 and full operation commenced in 1955. In addition to producing enriched uranium for weapons, the plant also supplied enriched uranium for the Navy and commercial fuel. The Paducah Plant also acted as the uranium hexafluoride feed point for all gaseous diffusion plants until 1964. Throughout the course of its operations, the potential for beryllium exposure existed at this site.

From 1951- July 28, 1998 all 3,556 acres were exclusively controlled by the Government and considered the DOE facility.

On July 1, 1993, the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC)*, a government-owned corporation formed under the Energy Policy Act of 1992, assumed control of the plant's uranium enrichment activities. USEC, which was fully privatized in July 1998, produced low enriched uranium for commercial use through May 2013. Between July 29, 1998 and September 30, 2014, only roads and grounds outside the perimeter fence surrounding the enrichment facilities, plus approximately 200 acres of grounds inside the fence, remained under the exclusive control of DOE's Office of Environmental Management. During this timeframe the inner portion of the footprint was leased to USEC to support uranium enrichment operations and DOE maintained its responsibility for addressing the environmental cleanup resulting from historic plant operations.

By October 2014 USEC had returned the leased plant facilities back to DOE and regulatory control reverted from USEC/NRC back to DOE. Therefore by October 1, 2014, the entire property is again considered a DOE facility.

 

DOE

DOE has a webpage on the Paducah Cleanup and an webpage for the Paducah Project office.

DOE Contractors

  • Lockheed Martin Utility Services (1995-1999)
  • Martin Marietta Utility Services (1993-1995)
  • Martin Marietta Energy Systems (1984-1993)
  • Union Carbide Corporation Nuclear Division (1952-1984)
  • Fluor Federal Services Paducah Deactivation Project (July 2014–present)
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    DOL

    DOL provides Part B and Part E statistics on Paducah as well as exposure information from their Paducah Site Exposure Matrix.

    EPA

    Paducah is an EPA Superfund site

     

    NIOSH

    NIOSH provides statistics on Paducah dose reconstructions.  NIOSH has developed technical basis documents for Paducah and a Special Exposure Cohort was mandated by Congress.

    Other

  • Wikipedia has an article on Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant.
  • The Wall Street Journal Waste Lands series provides information on Paducah.
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    Paducah Videos

     

    Paducah Documents

  • KY-265 Recovery of Uranium Hexafluoride from a Gas Stream by Absorption in a Fluidized Bed of Uranium Tetrafluoride--1958
  • KY-373 Variations in isotopic Content of Natural Uranium--1961
  • KY-400 Union Carbide Nuclear Company Radiation Standards & Practices. Recommendations of the Committee on Radiation Standards & Practices--1962
  • KY-458 Environmental monitoring summary for the Paducah Plant for 1962 and 1963
  • KY-543 Environmental monitoring summary for the Paducah Plant for 1965 & 1966
  • KY-581 Variations in U234 Concentration of Natural Uranium--1969
  • KY-582 Environmental Monitoring Summary for the Paducah Plant for 1967 and 1968
  • KY-624 Environmental Monitoring Summary for the Paducah Plant for 1969
  • KY-629 Environmental Monitoring Summary for the Paducah Plant for 1970
  • KY-662 Removal of Trace Quantities of Neptunium & Plutonium Fluorides from Uranium Hexafluoride--1975
  • Final Environmental Impact Assessment of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant site--1982
  • Arsenic Removal from Gaseous Streams--1989
  • Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Environmental Report for 1989
  • Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Environmental Report for 1992
  • Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Environmental Report Summary for 1993
  • Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Annual Environmental Report Summary for 1994
  • Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Annual Environmental Report Summary for 1995
  • Evaluation of Natural Attenuation Processes for Trichloroethylene &Technetium-99 in the NE & NW Plumes at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant--1997
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     Photos courtesy of DOE and Library of Congress